Conference Publicatons

After reviews, conference articles will be published in following journals:




Place of publication will be chosen according to the relevant topic of the submitted paper.

In the case of obtaining a positive recommendation for publication in the journal, the author will be required to submit work in accordance to requirements of the journal editorial.

All papers must be sent until 1st of August 2017 to the following address:  eciconference@gmail.com

2016

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 204–216
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0028

Abstract:
Depending on their involvement in assisting their child’s development, parents may have various chances of improving and refining their childcare, parenting, and therapeutic methods. The objective of this study was to learn the opinions of the parents of children covered by the early intervention/early assisted-development programme regarding their own involvement in the processes, and determining which types of involvement, whether active or passive, the parents seem to practice. The empirical material was acquired in a survey conducted in the form of a questionnaire in May 2015 and June 2016, covering a total of 143 parents. According to our results, the respondents not only follow the recommendations provided by the specialists based at a given support centre (96.5%), but also actively seek information and knowledge related to activities and measures aimed at assisting their child’s development, incorporating them in daily childcare and education routine (88.8%). Most respondents (65%) actively seek the specialists’ advice and opinion related to the child’s education and development as well as keep the child company at the appointments, sessions, and activities held at the centre (63.65%). A large majority (90.2%) combine various types of “active” (self-inspired) involvement with “passive” (specialist-inspired) involvement of supportive character. Each of the parents covered by the study engages in assisting the child’s development at home according to the specialists’ recommendations, or we might say, as inspired by the specialist team. There is a need for enhancing the parents’ “active” (self-inspired) involvement in the child’s situation at the centre (encouraging initiativetaking) as well as the parents’ specialist-inspired involvement in the child’s situation at the centre.

Keywords: early intervention, early assisted-development programme, active/passive involvement in assisting early childhood development

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 217–224
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0029

Abstract:
Early intervention and early support are actions aimed at a child with disturbed development and their families. The emergence of any developmental disorders in a child is always a stressful situation and demanding changes and taking action to support parents. The resource enabling one to get additional help is the social network of the family. The quality of services depends on the size and category of persons that compose it. It should be borne in mind that focusing solely on the rehabilitation of the child – taking for granted the needs of the remaining family members – may lead over time to the dysfunction of the whole family. Restrictions that appear and result from the child’s disability, create a real threat of marginalising or even exclusion of the family from social life. It is unable to overcome the crisis without any help, therefore the actions of family support networks also play an important role. The main objective of this article centred around the information on the relationship between the size of a support network, the kind of the disorder in children and strategies for coping with stress in parents of children participating in the process of early support or early intervention. The study covered 93 parents. The Map and Questionnaire of Social Support of Zdzisław Bizoń and Inventory to Measure Coping Strategies with Stress – Brief COPE were applied. Analysis of the results showed no significant correlation between the two variables. The applied statistical analysis allowed us to identify the most commonly used strategies to cope with stress by parents and enabled us to characterise the size of the network and the categories of people who create it. The article ends with conclusions concerning the areas of practical actions under early intervention.

Keywords: coping with stress, family, early childhood intervention, social network

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 225–228
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0030

Abstract:
The content of this paper is a report on activities in children’s facilities and their ability to influence parenting skills in terms of institutional childcare at an early age. Children’s facilities (infant homes, children’s homes and children’s centres) provide comprehensive care for children and parents in cases where, for various reasons, a child’s all-round development is disrupted or their life is in danger. The main purpose of these facilities is to provide adequate childcare as well as to support families when restoring basic functions. On the basis of a survey conducted in children’s facilities, the most frequent difficulties in exercising parenting skills are identified, and subsequently, information on the extent to which children’s facilities contribute to the development of parenting skills and help in the rehabilitation of a family is outlined.

Keywords: child, family, parenting skills, institutional care

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 229–236
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0031

Abstract:
Receiving information on child’s disease or disability is a very difficult and often traumatic experience for the parents. Researchers investigating this issue indicate an array of negative parental emotional reactions such as: a sense of loss, loneliness, shock, mutual blaming, uncertainty, anxiety. Early intervention, understood as interdisciplinary services provided by physiotherapists, doctors, pedagogues, psychologists, and other specialists in the first years of child’s life, is equally needed by both children themselves and their parents, who, owing to the provided education and support, mature to the role of a parent-caretaker-therapist. The paper will address the results of a research conducted among parents of children with rare genetic diseases. The respondents shared their experiences associated with early intervention, assessed the quality of the received support as well as its effects on the child and the family. The study was conducted based on qualitative research methodology. I conducted narrative interviews with the mothers and fathers of children affected by rare chromosomal disorders. The analysis of narration focused on the experiences associated with implemented or non-implemented early intervention. Some of the parents of children with rare chromosomal syndromes had no opportunity to participate in early intervention; respondents in this group complained about specialists ignoring the reported problems and described disease symptoms as well as being involved in a “therapeutic pursuit” for a long time. The other group included parents participating in early intervention programmes. The experience of a rare disease increased their need to expand their knowledge on the disease and treatment options, which certainly presented a significant challenge for specialists. However, even in such a difficult situation it is possible to implement a model early intervention programme, as reported by one of respondents.

Keywords: early intervention, rare genetic disease, family

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 237–245
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0032

Abstract:
Aim: The aim of the study was to learn about the way in which early childhood developmental support is organised in the local environment. Material and methods: The research was conducted in two county towns among the employees of institutions organising and conducting early childhood developmental support. Results: Different systems of organising early childhood developmental support have been developed in the evaluated towns. In Oświęcim, all the activities (from providing expert opinions, through information campaigns and classes for children, to workshops for parents) are carried out by the Psychological and Pedagogical Counselling Centre. The early support in Cieszyn has developed as a grassroots system (in 2016 two private kindergartens will join the early support offer) and the Psychological and Pedagogical Counselling Centre provides opinions on the need for early developmental support. Conclusions: In Europe in recent years, there has been a significant development in the support strategy targeting both young children requiring early support and their families. Despite the implementation of a government pilot programme in Poland ten years ago, systemic solutions are still lacking. Other European countries implement early intervention to support the development of children diagnosed with developmental disorders or retardation. In the Polish system, however, the child’s support is uncoordinated (the tasks are divided between three different ministries: health, education, and social welfare ministry) and often based on the child’s disability certificate. Some legislative changes should be introduced to enable establishing local centres of early support/intervention. It is also necessary to organise terminology so that children who show developmental disorders could receive immediate support, without waiting for the certification of their disability.

Keywords:
a support system for a disabled child or a child at risk of disability and their families, social policy, early intervention, early support

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 246–255
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0033

Abstract:
Aim of the study: According to David H. Olson’s circumplex model of family systems, there are particular dimensions that form the basis for good adaptation and growth, namely flexibility, cohesion, communication and family life satisfaction. The study explores the connections between these dimensions of family functioning, socioeconomic status of the family and educational achievements (reading, writing and numeracy skills) of preschool and early school-age children. Method: The subjects were 105 children, aged 5–6, and 105 parents of these children from the Silesian region in Poland. The parents filled out Family Rating Scales – Skale Oceny Rodziny, SOR (Margasiński, 2009), i.e. the Polish adaptation of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale known as FACES IV (Olson and Gorall, 2006), and demographic questions to assess the family’s socioeconomic status (SES). The children completed a computer-adaptive test of school ability at the start of school (Test Umiejętności na Starcie Szkolnym, TUNSS, Kaczan and Rycielski, 2014). Results: Multivariate structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed, confirming both SES and SOR to influence the children’s level of school skills at the start of school. The children’s age (expressed in months) presented as an important variable in the model. These factors explain 78% of variance of early school abilities. The number of books and mother’s education level were found to be the variables the most closely linked to school abilities amongst the SES factors. Children with a balanced family system background reached better scores in school abilities than children from unbalanced family systems.

Keywords:
SES, family, school abilities at school start

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 256–261
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0034

Abstract:
Numerous clinical experiments show that the moment when a parent learns that their child has been diagnosed with developmental disorders is important for the process of further treatment and rehabilitation of the child. Emotional experiences while being informed of the first diagnosis may influence the parent’s attitude to the child’s disability and have an effect on the relation with professionals who participate in broadly conceived rehabilitation and therapy. An inappropriate way of informing parents about the child’s developmental disorders may even lead to a severe trauma and have serious far-reaching consequences. Although painful experiences cannot be prevented, as the situation itself is stress-inducing, the trauma may be eased if the professional avoids undesirable behaviour, such as delaying the time when the information is passed to parents, not making sure what they understood of the diagnosis, not paying attention to the parents’ emotions at a given moment and not informing them of treatment and rehabilitation possibilities. The article presents a theoretical analysis of the influence of the first diagnosis on the occurrence of such emotions as fear of the future and past, the sense of guilt and shame. Those emotions have been analysed with reference to the experiences of parents of children with developmental disorders. The author has based the analysis on the results of studies conducted by various researchers, both Polish and foreign, and discussed parents’ experiences when they are informed of their child’s disability, emotions that they feel and the influence of those emotions on cognitive processes (especially perception and memory) as well as expectations that parents have of doctors and other professionals.

Keywords:
communication, disabled children, emotions, professional–family relations

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 262–269
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0035

Abstract:
The development of an individual and its determinants are of interest to medicine, psychology, educational science and sociology. A child staying with its mother in prison isolation is a special, difficult social situation. On the one hand, it allows for a normal development of a child aged 0–3 years, but on the other hand, it is associated with a number of risks. The aim of the article is to present the determinants of the development of a child staying with its mother in prison isolation in the social context as well as in the light of selected psychological theories. The paper presents the peculiarities of prison stay of women who are mothers as well as its legal, formal and rehabilitative aspects with regard to the mother, the child and the mother–child dyad. It is assumed that mother and child homes within correctional facilities are a form of early support of the child’s development in the difficult situation of the mother being imprisoned. The article provides a detailed description of the standards of the mother and child’s stay at such facilities (residential, recreational and therapeutic rooms, living conditions) as a form of securing the basic and specific needs of women and children. The paper focuses on presenting the environmental factors that support and protect the normal development of the child and the mother-and-child relationship such as the presence of the correctional facility staff (counsellors, psychologists) and medical personnel (physicians, nurses). The article also presents resources (intellectual norm, high motivation to fulfil oneself in the role of a mother) and adverse factors (deficits in functioning in social roles, low self-esteem, lack of a sense of competence or exploitative treatment of children) for women convicted of a crime as well as methods of rehabilitation, education and therapy. Important aspects of the discussed interventions include shaping an appropriate relationship between the mother and the child, building parental skills and continuous verification of the state of the relationship by the correctional facility staff. The presentation of the praxeological dimension of the problem represents a starting point for further investigation of the subject.

Keywords:
child development, prison isolation, attachment theory, family

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 270–273
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0036

Abstract:
The main purpose of the article is to present normal development of the child in the first period of life – early childhood, in terms of emotional and social development. The author presents different developmental milestones, paying attention to their causes and consequences for further development. The article takes into consideration the different phases of appearance of first emotions and their (self-)regulation. Self-regulation is regarded as one of the late core competences of a child, constituting the basis for the entire child’s social and cognitive development. In the subsequent parts of the article, the stages of social development are highlighted, with particular emphasis on the first behavioural signs such as eye contact and following the carer. Finally, the author also addresses the stages of moral development as a vital part of each child’s socialization. In addition, the article highlights how important parents’ competences are for the appropriate social and emotional development of the child and what the consequences of abnormal patterns of parenting are, including the lack or too much restriction of the child’s exploration. An important aspect is also how the development in other areas: motor and cognitive development, with particular emphasis on speech, often directly influences the emotional and social development of the child.

Keywords:
social development, emotional development, moral development

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 274–279
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0037

Abstract:
Music accompanies a man almost throughout their whole life. As early as in the prenatal period, a baby reacts to the sounds it is “wrapped in.” An infant turns its head towards the voice of the mother and shows interest in the melodies that she hums and lullabies that she sings. At the subsequent stages of development, children use their own bodies, toys, everyday objects and domestic equipment to produce sounds, they create their own rhythms, melodies, and build simple music instruments. They play, learn and rest humming favourite tunes, singing hit songs, clapping, tapping their fingers or stumping their feet to produce the rhythm of well-known songs. In the early intervention (education) of a child, various methods of early diagnosis of developmental disorders and rehabilitation are used. More and more often, these include unconventional measures, e.g. music. Sound and music signals, correctly interpreted by the parents and intervention education professionals, enable them to better understand the child’s desires, expectations and predispositions, and thus to better react to his or her messages and engage in a dialogue with the child. This may reduce the risk of developmental abnormalities and problems and it may be an effective form of supporting the child and their family. The ubiquity of sounds, both musical and non-musical, and various functions that they fulfil in the life of a contemporary human being leads various professionals, such as doctors, psychologist, teachers and music therapists, to use musical communication in order to help children that are at the risk of abnormal development or disability and their parents.

Keywords:
child, communication, music therapy, family, early intervention (education)

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 280–283
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0038

Abstract:
This is a case study of a 6-year-old boy with mild intellectual disability and autism as well as an attempt to take a synthetic look at his functioning in both home and peer group environment. The paper particularly focuses on the issues related to the widely understood developmental support, a systemic perception of family functioning as well as optimisation of child’s environment and diet. Attention was also paid to the importance of functional diagnosis, which is performed by an early developmental support team, and which allows for a holistic look at the child and their family. This specific example shows what changes can be made in child’s life within 3 years, provided that family members are engaged in the therapeutic process and seemingly insignificant aspects of life are modified.

Keywords:
autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, early developmental support

Full article

Journal of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology 2016, 16 (4), p. 284–287
DOI: 10.15557/PiPK.2016.0039

Abstract:
Early intervention becomes an increasingly common subject of interdisciplinary considerations related to child care from the first moments of life. The earlier action is taken against the risk of child’s disability, the greater the possibility of success in defeating it. One of the main goals of early intervention is to detect the earliest threats to child’s development. The present study draws attention to the circumstances hindering proper development based on a case study. There are many methods that prove to be useful in the daily practice of a special educator. However, psychodrama provides the opportunity to capture the moment when preventive measures should be introduced. The expertise of a special educator combined with psychodrama enables an insight into the child’s future and allows to plan actions that will best support the child’s development. Only very early support of a child at risk of disability and their family, with a particular focus on the parents, will enable normal development of the child in all spheres.

Keywords:
early intervention, psychodrama, support, special educator, family

Full article